The First Advising Meeting

The First Advising Meeting

The First Advising Meeting

The first meeting with your advisees is a good opportunity for you to offer key information about the nature, responsibilities and goals of the advising relationship. During the first meeting, you may wish to:

  • Explain your role as Faculty Academic Adviser – what your advisees can expect from you and what you will expect of them. It is important for your advisees to be clear about the rights and responsibilities of both advisers and advisees and the professional nature of the advising relationship.
  • Inquire with your advisees about their academic backgrounds, goals and interests. This information will help you better understand your advisees and in turn facilitate you in providing appropriate advice on course enrollment, major / minor selections, and your advisees’ long term academic plans.
  • Discuss the course enrollments of your advisees and discuss whether their study plans fit their academic goal.
  • Remind your advisees the important dates of their studies, such as add/drop periods, and explain the key features of their curricula (especially if they are freshmen).
  • Introduce your advisees the available resources for academic planning, such as AAO, this academic advising website and your Faculty website.
  • Let your advisees know your contact information, such as your telephone number, your email and your office hours.

Other possible discussion topics (not exclusive) with your advisees:

  • What they would like to discuss and get out of the advising meeting
  • The reason for choosing the study programme in which they are now enrolled
  • Their non-academic background (e.g., extracurricular activities)
  • Their personal and career goals
  • The major they intend to declare
  • The curriculum structure and graduation requirements
  • The effort they are expected to pay to their studies in order to achieve good grades
  • How study at University is different from that of secondary school
  • Tips on study skills
  • Other campus resources and websites they should view, such as CEDARS for student loans, personal adjustment issues, counseling and career advising and HKUSU / Faculty Societies for extra-curricular activities